Wednesday, March 20, 2013 (Location: Movenpick Hotel)

19:00 — 21:00
Pre-conference Conference Welcome Reception

Thursday, March 21, 2013 (Location: CERN)

07:00 — 07:30
Conference Registration at Movenpick
07:30 — 07:40
Buses Depart the Movenpick for CERN
09:00 — 09:45
Conference Co-Chair Welcome and Introduction to CERN / ATLAS Visit GROUP 1

Panelists

Sergio Bertolucci, CERN

photo of Sergio Bertolucci

Sergio Bertolucci serves as Director for Research and Scientific Computing at CERN. Before his time at CERN, he chaired the LHC committee and was a member of DESY’s physics research committee. He was also vice-president and a member of the Board of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN). A former Pisa scholar, Sergio Bertolucci has worked at DESY, Fermilab and Frascati. He was a member of the group that founded Fermilab’s CDF experiment and has been involved in the design, construction and running of the CDF detector. Sergio Bertolucci has been technical coordinator of the team responsible for the design and construction of the KLOE detector at the DAFNE storage ring at the Frascati National Laboratories (LNF). He was appointed head of the LNF accelerator division and the DAFNE project, becoming Director in 2002.

Julian Birkinshaw, London Business School

photo of Julian Birkinshaw

Julian Birkinshaw is Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship and Director of the Deloitte Institute at the London Business School. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, and the Academy of International Business. He is also a co-founder with Gary Hamel of the Management Lab (MLab).

Julian Birkinshaw has PhD and MBA degrees in Business from the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, and a BSc (Hons) from the University of Durham. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the Stockholm School of Economics, 2009.

Julian Birkinshaw's main area of expertise is in strategy and organisation in large established firms, and on such specific issues as management innovation, strategic agility, corporate entrepreneurship, organisation design, and headquarters-subsidiary relationships. He is the author of thirteen books including Becoming a Better Boss (2013), Reinventing Management (2010), and Giant Steps in Management (2007), and over ninety articles in such journals as Strategic Management Journal, Organization Science and Harvard Business Review.

Bettina Büchel, IMD

photo of Bettina Büchel

Bettina Büchel has been Professor of Strategy and Organization at IMD since 2000. She is member of IMD’s President’s Council. Her current research topics include strategy implementation, new business development, strategic alliances and change management. She is Director of the public program Orchestrating Winning Performance program as well as several partnership programs. She has worked extensively with companies such as Nestlé, Allianz, Evonik, Commerzbank, Nilfisk-Advance and others in developing strategic priorities, implementing strategic initiatives and managing change. She received her bachelor of economics and public administration at the University of Constance, Germany, her Masters of Human Resources and Industrial Relations at Rutgers University, USA and her PhD at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. After obtaining her PhD, she worked as an Assistant Professor at the Asian Institute of Technology in Bangkok where she was teaching MBA and PhD students from across Asia.

Albrecht Enders, IMD

photo of Albrecht Enders

Albrecht Enders is Professor of Strategy and Innovation at IMD. Prior to joining IMD, he worked as an Assistant Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Nuremberg in Germany and as a consultant for the Boston Consulting Group in Cologne. His major research interest is the reaction of companies to discontinuous changes in their environment.Most recently, he and his co-authors received the 2011 Glueck Best Paper Award of the Business Policy and Strategy Division of the Academy of Management for a study that examines the influence of CEO Narcissism on the ability of their organizations to react to discontinuous changes.

Markus Nordberg, CERN

photo of Markus Nordberg

Markus Nordberg has a degree both in Physics and in Business Administration and is the Resources Coordinator of the ATLAS project at CERN, Switzerland, where his responsibilities include budget planning, reporting and resources allocation for the ATLAS project. He has a background in project management, technology transfer and corporate strategy. He has published articles and books in the domains of innovation, strategy and project management and technology transfer. Markus Nordberg has also served as Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Centrum voor Bedrijfseconomie, Faculty ESP-Solvay Business School, University of Brussels, and is a member of SMS, AOM and the Association of Finnish Parliament Members and Scientists, TUTKAS.

Timo Santalainen, Aalto University

photo of Timo Santalainen

Timo J. Santalainen's career concept is a combination of academia, business and consulting. His previous academic positions include professorships at Thunderbird Graduate School of Global Management, Texas Tech University and Management Centre Europe. He has held senior executive positions in retailing, banking and world sports organizations. Currently he is President of STRATNET, a Geneva-based network of strategy advisors, and Adjunct Professor of Strategy and International Management at Aalto University Business School, Lappeenranta University of Technology and Finnish Defence University. His most recent field of interest is strategic management and thinking in transformational and parastatal organizations such as telecommunications, energy, sports, public service and research. He has been a strategy adviser and Board member for many of these organizations throughout the world. Timo Santalainen is Founding Member of Strategic Management Society. He is the author or co-author of ten books, numerous chapters in books and articles in leading international publications.

(see full session details)

10:00 — 11:15
Plenary Panel: Inside Outliers - Driving Systematic Change / ATLAS Visit GROUP 2

Panelists

Robert Burgelman, Stanford University

photo of Robert Burgelman

Robert Burgelman is the Edmund W. Littlefield Professor of Management and the Executive Director of the Stanford Executive Program (SEP) of the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, where he has taught since 1981. He obtained a Licenciate degree in Applied Economics from Antwerp University (Belgium), and an MA in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Management of Organizations from Columbia University, where he studied with doctoral fellowships from the Ford Foundation (US) and ICM (Belgium). His research has focused on the role of strategy-making in firm evolution. In particular, he has studied the strategy-making processes involved in how companies enter into new businesses and exit from existing ones to secure continued adaptation. In 2003 he received an honorary doctorate from the Copenhagen Business School for his contributions to the study of corporate innovation and entrepreneurship. He has published many articles in leading academic and professional journals. He has taught executive programs and led senior and top management seminars for major companies worldwide. He currently serves on the board of directors of SHOP.COM, a private company.

Lina Constantinovici, StartupNectar

photo of Lina Constantinovici

Lina Constantinovici is Founder of Startup Nectar, the Biomimicry Incubator - the first business incubator focused on increasing the number of viable biomimetic products, services, and organizations in the world with a curriculum for building organizations that create conditions conducive to life. She is also Head of US Operations at GrowVC US, the first global peer-to-peer micro-funding marketplace for startups. For over 20 years, Lina Constantinovici has been engaged in innovation in the public, private, and NGO sectors as an entrepreneur, strategist, sustainability consultant and educator. Lina Constantinovici has worked with the San Francisco Department of Environment, the EPA, Walmart, W Hotels, GreenBiz.com, the Detroit Health Authority, and dozens of sustainable start ups. She is the recipient of the international RE:STORE award for her sustainable retail center design and was a contributing researcher for the State of Green Business 2008.

Marina Gorbis, Institute For The Future

photo of Marina Gorbis

Marina Gorbis is the Executive Director of the Institute for the Future (IFTF). Before becoming IFTF's Executive Director in 2006, Marina Gorbis created the Global Innovation Forum, a project comparing innovation strategies in different regions, and she founded Global Ethnographic Network (GEN), a multi-year ethnographic research program aimed at understanding daily lives of people in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and Silicon Valley. She has been a guest blogger on BoingBoing.net and writes for IFTF and major media outlets. An innovative thinker and writer, Marina Gorbis is currently finishing a book tentatively titled Socialstructing: Designing for the Future, to be released by Simon Shuster in January 2013. During her tenure with IFTF and previously with SRI International, she has worked with hundreds of organizations in business, education, government, and philanthropy, bringing a future perspective to develop vision and strategies, improve innovation capacity, and design new products and services.

Liisa Valikangas, Aalto University

photo of Liisa Valikangas

Liisa Välikangas is Professor of Innovation Management at Helsinki School of Economics. Previously, she was Research Director of the Woodside Institute in California—a professional research organization dedicated to advancing innovative management practice and organizational resilience. She is also Founder and President of Innovation Democracy, Inc., a nonprofit organization committed to supporting innovative entrepreneurship in countries of importance to world stability. Her research on innovation, strategy and organizing has been published in Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, Wall Street Journal, among other leading journals, and presented to various executive audiences. She is in the board of SCANCOR, the Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research at Stanford University and Helsingin Sanomat Foundation, dedicated to the study of future, freedom of speech and democracy.

Being positively different is the goal of strategic management. Highly “impactful” organizations capitalize on heterogeneity not only in terms of fleeting egocentric competitive advantages but by driving system level changes in their environments. Outlier organizations distinguish themselves, and influence systems, through multiple, often overlooked, mechanisms that often are found not to fit within mainstream management research models. We find value in heterogeneity and look beyond regressed mean for organizations that can positively shape the future. We propose to bring Outliers back into the fold and learn from highly impactful organizations - how to be, how to become and how to remain an Outlier (in a dynamic interdependent ecosystem.) (see full session details)

11:15 — 11:45
Coffee Break
11:45 — 13:00
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions / ATLAS Visit GROUP 3

Track A: Business Models of Expert Organizations

Session 30
Enablers and Antecedents Of Business Models

Track B: Driving Innovation Ecosystems

Session 44
Driving Innovation Ecosystems: Research Opportunities and Empirical Challenges

Track C: Large Scale Practice Implementations

Session 13
What Practices Characterize Outlier Organizations
13:00 — 14:00
Luncheon
14:00 — 15:15
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions / ATLAS Visit GROUP 4

Track B: Driving Innovation Ecosystems

Session 40
China's Capacity for Innovation and the Emerging Competitiveness of Chinese Companies

Track C: Large Scale Practice Implementations

Session 9
Innovation

Track D: Innovative Management Practices: Taking Big Leaps

Session 23
Institutional Perspectives on Management Innovation
15:15 — 15:45
Coffee Break
15:45 — 17:00
Plenary Presentation: Can Research Save Us? / ATLAS Visit GROUP 5

Session Chair

Markus Nordberg, CERN

photo of Markus Nordberg

Markus Nordberg has a degree both in Physics and in Business Administration and is the Resources Coordinator of the ATLAS project at CERN, Switzerland, where his responsibilities include budget planning, reporting and resources allocation for the ATLAS project. He has a background in project management, technology transfer and corporate strategy. He has published articles and books in the domains of innovation, strategy and project management and technology transfer. Markus Nordberg has also served as Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Centrum voor Bedrijfseconomie, Faculty ESP-Solvay Business School, University of Brussels, and is a member of SMS, AOM and the Association of Finnish Parliament Members and Scientists, TUTKAS.

Speaker

Sidney Winter, University of Pennsylvania

photo of Sidney Winter

Sidney G. Winter is the Deloitte and Touche Professor of Management, Emeritus, at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. During his career he has held regular or visiting appointments at seven universities, served on the staffs of the U.S. General Accounting Office, the RAND Corporation and the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers, been a consultant for various governmental and non-profit organizations, and appeared as an expert witness in antitrust and other litigation. With Richard Nelson, he co-authored An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change (1982). His recent research focus has been on the study of management problems from the viewpoint of evolutionary economics. He is an elected fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Sidney Winter is a graduate of Swarthmore College, and received his doctorate in economics from Yale University. He is also a member of the SMS Fellows.

Looking at the amazing achievements made in collective scientific and technological undertakings, I ask myself, “How does it happen that we can explore the Solar System, but we still can’t feed Earth’s population? How come we can break the atom but still have not addressed climate change effectively or cracked the global energy problem? Is it the way the scientists choose their problems and manage themselves? Or it the way they think? Or the influence of governments and politics? My talk explores the how the path of innovative achievement is shaped by the ecosystem where the related actors operate. (see full session details)

17:00 — 17:45
CERN Lecturettes / ATLAS Visit GROUP 6
18:00 — 19:30
Cocktail Reception
19:00 — 20:15
Transportation to Lausanne for dinner on your own

Friday, March 22, 2013 (Location: IMD)

08:15 — 09:30
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions/Panel Sessions

Track A: Business Models of Expert Organizations

Session 33
Business Models As Systems Of Activities And Choices

Track B: Driving Innovation Ecosystems

Session 42
Network Dynamics

Track C: Large Scale Practice Implementations

Session 12
Dynamic Capabilities and Decision Making

Track D: Innovative Management Practices: Taking Big Leaps

Session 17
Corporate Structures for Managing Innovation
Session 47
Disruptive Change and Strategic Innovation
08:15 — 09:30
IMD Discovery Event Session: Do Your Genes Fit? Innovation and Corporate Culture: Why Haier can, Sony could and Samsung Can't

Panelists

Bill Fischer, IMD

photo of Bill Fischer

Bill Fischer is Professor of Innovation Management at IMD. He has been actively involved in technology-related activities his entire professional career. He was a development engineer in the American steel industry; an officer in the US Army Corps of Engineers; and has also consulted on R&D and technology issues in industries such as: pharmaceuticals, telecommunications, textiles and apparel, and packaging. Bill Fischer was the Executive President and Dean of China Europe International Business School (CEIBS), in Shanghai, and was on the faculty at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He has served as a consultant to a number of government and international-aid agencies on issues relating to the management of science and technology. His areas of special interest include: technology of transfer, management of technology, including management of the creative processes within R&D, and the creation and coordination of an international technology presence.

This is not about denim! Instead, it’s about how the likelihood for innovative success can be assessed by studying the “genetic material” that gives birth to corporate cultures and their potential for innovation. Apple’s got it; Pixar’s got it; Toyota’s got it; even Haier’s got it! Sony had it, but lost it; and Samsung had the right DNA for what it was doing as an OEM supplier, but tried to move into being a fast-moving, big-branded consumer electronics company, and found that it didn’t have the genes for it. What we’re talking about here is how corporate culture drives innovation potential, and how corporate culture is, in fact, determined by the granular, detailed choices that managers make throughout an organization. We’ll look at how to develop an analytical approach to “decoding” organizational DNA for innovation. (see full session details)

09:30 — 10:00
Coffee Break
10:00 — 11:15
Plenary Presentation: Key Drivers Behind “Big Bang” Science and Open Innovation

Session Chair

Bala Chakravarthy, IMD

photo of Bala Chakravarthy

Bala Chakravarthy is Professor of Strategy and International Management and holds the Shell Chair in Sustainable Business Growth at IMD, Switzerland. Bala Chakravarthy’s research and teaching interests cover three related areas: strategy processes for sustainable business growth, corporate renewal, and leadership dilemmas. He has published four books, several case studies and numerous articles on these topics in top journals. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Strategic Management Society (SMS) from 1999-2004. He is also an inaugural Fellow of the SMS.

Speaker

Henry Chesbrough, University of California-Berkeley

photo of Henry Chesbrough

Henry Chesbrough is best known for his theories of modern business – open innovation. He is the author of several award winning books and was named to the Thinkers50 list in 2011. He serves as Executive Director, Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation at the University of California, Berkeley, Haas School of Business, which focuses on conducting research, publishing articles and developing teaching materials around open innovation. Henry Chesbrough is also a tenured Full Professor at ESADE Business School in Barcelona, Spain. He is the author of more than 20 case studies on companies in the IT and life sciences sectors, available through Harvard Business School Publishing. Prior to his academic career, Henry Chesbrough spent 10 years in various product planning and strategic marketing positions in Silicon Valley companies.

“Big Bang” Innovations are, by definition, paradigm shifters and discontinuous by nature. Such jumps are typical in the domain of leading scientific undertakings, such as in cracking the human genome, hunting for the Higgs in particle physics or attempting to solve the energy problem by fusion research. Open science supports open innovation. But these “quantum leaps” are not only the privilege of frontier science. Industry has also grasped the fact that not all best ideas originate from their own research labs which can be successfully marketed internally. My talk will look at the key drivers behind the open innovation process and explain how early adopters can make best use of it. I’ll give some examples, also in industries outside ‘high technology’ domain. (see full session details)

11:30 — 12:45
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions/Panel Sessions

Track A: Business Models of Expert Organizations

Session 46
Business Model Innovation

Track B: Driving Innovation Ecosystems

Session 39
Innovation Ecosystems and the Public Sector
Session 45
Retaining the Entrepreneurial Spirit

Track C: Large Scale Practice Implementations

Session 11
Organizational Change

Track D: Innovative Management Practices: Taking Big Leaps

Session 14
Management Innovation
11:30 — 12:45
IMD Discovery Event Session: Frugal Innovation

Panelists

Pasha Mahmood, IMD

photo of Pasha Mahmood

Pasha Mahmood is currently a Professor of Strategy & Asian Business at IMD Lausanne. Prior to this, he has been an Associate Professor at the National University of Singapore, and a visiting Professor at the Hitotsubashi University, Japan. He also worked as a consultant for Levitan and Associates and The MAC Group/ Gemini Consulting. He serves as a member of the editorial board of the Strategic Management Journal and as an Area Editor for the Journal of International Business Studies. Pasha Mahmood holds a PhD from Harvard University, and a B.A. from Oberlin College. He won the Haynes Prize from the Academy of International Business (AIB).

From $2500 cars to $35 laptops, frugal innovations that characterize the art of improvising effective solutions using limited resources, have been the hall mark of many emerging economies. As many developed economies face economic downturn, MNCs from these economies need to look to emerging economies for ways to do more for less, while serving broader markets. In this session, we use various examples to discuss the typical challenges facing frugal innovators and learn how firms can overcome those challenges (see full session details)

12:45 — 13:45
Luncheon
13:45 — 15:00
Plenary Presentation: Across the Great Divide: The Role of Theory as a Bridge Between Academia and Practice

Session Chair

Albrecht Enders, IMD

photo of Albrecht Enders

Albrecht Enders is Professor of Strategy and Innovation at IMD. Prior to joining IMD, he worked as an Assistant Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Nuremberg in Germany and as a consultant for the Boston Consulting Group in Cologne. His major research interest is the reaction of companies to discontinuous changes in their environment.Most recently, he and his co-authors received the 2011 Glueck Best Paper Award of the Business Policy and Strategy Division of the Academy of Management for a study that examines the influence of CEO Narcissism on the ability of their organizations to react to discontinuous changes.

Speaker

Clayton Christensen, Harvard University

photo of Clayton Christensen

Clayton Christensen is the Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. He started four successful enterprises including Innosight, a consulting firm that uses his theories of innovation to help companies create new growth businesses. Besides advising major corporate executives, Clayton Christensen is the author of nine books and more than a hundred articles. He received his BA with honors in economics from Brigham Young University and an M.Phil. in applied econometrics from Oxford University, where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. He received both an MBA with high distinction and a DBA from the Harvard Business School. Clayton Christensen was named a White House fellow and served as assistant to U.S. Transportation Secretaries Drew Lewis and Elizabeth Dole. He holds five honorary doctorates and an honorary chaired professorship at the Tsinghua University in Taiwan.

We have lost sight of a subtle but powerful fact, that data is only available about the past. We have become so fact based and data driven in our research that we can’t see in the future ourselves, nor do we enable others, practitioners and society at large, to see more clearly. As a result, the world around us has grown increasingly skeptical about the value of academic research. Ultimately, however, both practitioners and we, as academics, are interested in providing better answers to very similar questions such as: “When is one approach to innovation preferable over another approach?” or “What types of innovations will appeal to certain customers and which ones will not?”. Well-articulated theory provides answers, albeit preliminary ones, to these questions, as it puts forward statements about what causes what, why and under what circumstances . When put into the right language, these statements allow us to have insightful and fruitful conversations between practitioners and academics, which, in turn, allow us to test our assumptions, to identify our blind spots and to clarify our thinking. (see full session details)

15:00 — 15:30
Coffee Break
15:30 — 16:45
Plenary Panel: Meet The Mavericks

Panelists

Frederic Gastaldo, Louis Dreyfus Communications/Swisscom

photo of Frederic Gastaldo

Frederic Gastaldo began his professional career in 1988 at UGINE, switching in 1994 to the Boston Consulting Group in Paris. In 1997 he joined Cegetel Entreprises (Vivendi Group) as Chief Technology Officer. In 1998 he joined the Louis Dreyfus Group to become CEO and co-founder of Louis Dreyfus Communications. In 2003 Frédéric Gastaldo joined Swisscom, where he successfully developed Swisscom Hospitality Services, an international specialty provider of internet services for hotels and conference centers. He has since held various positions within the Swisscom Group, among others a member of Swisscom Switzerland Executive Board, in charge of Strategy and Innovation. He is currently Chairman of the Board of Swisscom Directories and local.ch and leads Swisscom entry in the Smart Grid space as CEO of Swisscom Energy Solutions AG. Frédéric Gastaldo holds a Master of Science degree from the Ecole Polytechnique, Paris and an Engineering M.Sc. degree from the Ecole des Mines, Paris.

Rachel Kentleton, EasyJet

photo of Rachel Kentleton

Rachel Kentleton is Director of Strategy at easyJet plc. Since the beginning of 2011, she has been responsible for corporate strategy, investor relations, and regulatory affairs. She joined easyJet in 2007 as Head of Investor Relations. Prior to easyJet, Rachel Kentleton worked in a number of finance and investor relations roles at Unilever, Diageo, and SABMiller.

Martin Reeves, Boston Consulting Group

photo of Martin Reeves

Martin Reeves is a Senior Partner and Managing Director in BCG's New York office and a senior member of the healthcare practice. He also leads The Strategy Institute, BCG’s vehicle for translating ideas from beyond the world of business, which have implications for strategy. Recent research themes include strategy and sustainability, new bases of competitive advantage, the economics of trust and sustainability, adaptive strategy and managerial heuristics. Martin Reeves joined BCG in London in 1989 and later moved to Tokyo, where he led the Japan health care practice for eight years and was responsible for BCG’s business with global clients. He has led numerous strategy and organizational assignments both for individual companies and industry associations. Before joining BCG, he worked for ICI, in Japan and the UK, in marketing and strategic planning. He holds a triple first class MA in natural sciences from Cambridge University and an MBA from Cranfield School of Management.

Lonnie Smith, Intuitive Surgical

photo of Lonnie Smith

Lonnie Smith joined Intuitive Surgical as President and CEO in June 1997, and currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors. During his tenure as CEO, Intuitive Surgical grew from a start-up with no revenue to over one billion dollars in revenue and approximately 1,300 employees. Prior to joining Intuitive Surgical, Lonnie Smith was Senior Executive Vice President of Hillenbrand Industries. He joined Hillenbrand in 1978. During his tenure, he was a member of the executive committee, the office of the president and the board of directors. He has also held positions at the Boston Consulting Group and IBM. Lonnie Smith received his B.S.E.E. from Utah State University and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

George Stalk Jr, The Boston Consulting Group

photo of George Stalk Jr

George Stalk Jr. is Senior Partner and Managing Director for The Boston Consulting Group as well as an Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management for the Rotman School of Management at University of Toronto. He joined BCG in 1978 and has worked in its Boston, Chicago, Tokyo and Toronto offices. His professional practice focuses on international and time-based competition. He holds a BSEM from the University of Michigan, an MSA&AE MIT and MBA from Harvard Business School. George Stalk Jr. co-authored a best-seller on “time-based” competition, Competing Against Time, and Kaisha: The Japanese Corporation. A somewhat controversial book, Hardball: Are You Playing to Play or to Playing to Win? was published in October of 2004. George Stalk Jr.’s latest book: Memos to the CEO: Strategies in Our Future was published in early 2008. He has also been published in several business publications, including the Harvard Business Review where he has won the McKinsey Award for the best article.

Simon Williams, QuantumBlack

photo of Simon Williams

Simon Williams is the Chief Executive and Co-Founder of QuantumBlack, a Data Science agency that help their clients derive new intelligence from data, craft strategic responses to that intelligence and help shape the capabilities required to deliver that response. They achieve this though a multi-disciplined approach blending strategy, analytics and design. Example projects include helping a global aerospace firm improve yield in strategic R&D investment, developing cutting-edge predictive audience analytics for a leading media company and creating a new visual language for biological research for a leading software firm. Prior to QuantumBlack Simon Williams led several data-driven start-ups including SmithBayes, a spin-out from Vodafone McLaren Mercedes Formula One racing team. He started his career in real-time trading systems at Reuters and then product management at ABN AMRO Bank.

Industries leaders are frequently toppled not by large competitors doing "more of the same", but increasingly by smaller companies that manage to shift the basis of competition in their industry with disruptive innovations. This session brings together academics, business practitioners and consultants to explore several real examples of when, how, and why such shifts happen. Four C-level executives from successful "outlier" companies will participate in a moderated panel discussion to share their rich first-hand accounts of how their companies have reshaped entire industries or attempt to do so. It’s a great opportunity to collide theory with fact and deepen our understanding of the outlier phenomenon. (see full session details)

17:00 — 18:00
IMD Discovery Event Session: How Will You Measure Your Life?

Panelists

Clayton Christensen, Harvard University

photo of Clayton Christensen

Clayton Christensen is the Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. He started four successful enterprises including Innosight, a consulting firm that uses his theories of innovation to help companies create new growth businesses. Besides advising major corporate executives, Clayton Christensen is the author of nine books and more than a hundred articles. He received his BA with honors in economics from Brigham Young University and an M.Phil. in applied econometrics from Oxford University, where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. He received both an MBA with high distinction and a DBA from the Harvard Business School. Clayton Christensen was named a White House fellow and served as assistant to U.S. Transportation Secretaries Drew Lewis and Elizabeth Dole. He holds five honorary doctorates and an honorary chaired professorship at the Tsinghua University in Taiwan.

In 2010 Clayton Christensen gave a powerful speech to the Howard Business School’s graduating class. Drawing upon his business research, he offered a series of guidelines for finding meaning and happiness in life. He used examples from his own experiences to explain how high achievers can all too often fall into traps that lead to unhappiness. A series of questions will be put forth in this session: How can I be sure that I’ll find satisfaction in my career? How can I be sure that my personal relationships become enduring sources of happiness? How can I avoid compromising my integrity-and stay out of jail? Using lessons from some of the world’s greatest businesses, he provides incredible insights into these challenging questions. (see full session details)

18:00 — 22:00
Aperitif & Dinner Event at IMD

Saturday, March 23, 2013 (Location: IMD)

08:15 — 09:30
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions

Track A: Business Models of Expert Organizations

Session 34
Business Model As Dynamic Capability

Track B: Driving Innovation Ecosystems

Session 35
Open Innovation
Session 43
Ecosystem Orchestration

Track D: Innovative Management Practices: Taking Big Leaps

Session 15
Ambidexterity
09:30 — 10:00
Coffee Break
10:00 — 11:15
Plenary Panel: Why We Need to Learn from Outliers - and Often Fail to Do So

Panelists

Julian Birkinshaw, London Business School

photo of Julian Birkinshaw

Julian Birkinshaw is Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship and Director of the Deloitte Institute at the London Business School. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, and the Academy of International Business. He is also a co-founder with Gary Hamel of the Management Lab (MLab).

Julian Birkinshaw has PhD and MBA degrees in Business from the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, and a BSc (Hons) from the University of Durham. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the Stockholm School of Economics, 2009.

Julian Birkinshaw's main area of expertise is in strategy and organisation in large established firms, and on such specific issues as management innovation, strategic agility, corporate entrepreneurship, organisation design, and headquarters-subsidiary relationships. He is the author of thirteen books including Becoming a Better Boss (2013), Reinventing Management (2010), and Giant Steps in Management (2007), and over ninety articles in such journals as Strategic Management Journal, Organization Science and Harvard Business Review.

Costas Markides, London Business School

photo of Costas Markides

Costas Markides is Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship and holds the Robert P. Bauman Chair of Strategic Leadership at the London Business School. He received his BA (Distinction) and MA in Economics from Boston University, and his MBA and DBA from the Harvard Business School. He serves on the Editorial Boards of several academic journals including the Strategic Management Journal, the Academy of Management Journal and the Sloan Management Review. He has done research and published several books as well as articles on the topics of diversification, strategic innovation, business-model innovation, and international acquisitions. His current research interests include the management of diversified firms and the use of innovation and creativity to achieve strategic breakthroughs.

The essence of superior strategy is standing out from the crowd. But most companies end up looking just like their competitors – they copy each other’s products and services, they benchmark each other’s best practices, and they hire each other’s executives. One well-known way of breaking out of this self-referential loop is to get inspiration from outliers – from the mavericks within an industry, to the unusual players in related industries and indeed entirely unrelated social settings. This sounds like a good idea, but it is extremely hard to do in practice. The evidence shows that the interesting “outliers” in the world of business, companies such as Apple, Google, Semco, Oticon, WL Gore, and HCL, typically attract a great deal of interest but don’t end up having much real impact on the companies studying them. The session will offer practical and theoretical insights into the challenge of learning from outliers. (see full session details)

11:30 — 12:45
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions

Track A: Business Models of Expert Organizations

Session 31
Business Model Research: Clarifying Conceptual Issues

Track B: Driving Innovation Ecosystems

Session 37
Dynamic Capabilities and Innovation Ecosystem Dynamics

Track C: Large Scale Practice Implementations

Session 10
Large Scale Collaboration and Inclusion

Track D: Innovative Management Practices: Taking Big Leaps

Session 20
Innovative Management Practices
Session 22
Alliances, Venture Capital Firms, and Innovation
11:30 — 12:45
IMD Discovery Event Session: Entrepreneurial Solutions to Market Failure

Panelists

Joseph Bower, Harvard University

photo of Joseph Bower

Joseph Bower is the Baker Foundation Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He served as the faculty chair of both The Corporate Leader Program and The General Management Program at Harvard. An expert on corporate strategy, organization, and leadership, he has devoted much of his teaching and research to challenges confronting corporate leaders in today’s rapidly changing hyper-competitive conditions. Joseph Bower has also been active in the development of institutions and programs. He helped establish the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. He also founded the Program for Senior Managers in Government at Harvard’s JFK School of Government. Currently, he is helping to build the new joint MBA-MPP degree program joint offered by the Business School and the Kennedy School of Government. Joseph Bower has consulted widely on problems of strategy and organization with companies here and abroad and has written more than a dozen books.

Howard Yu, IMD

photo of Howard Yu

Howard Yu is Professor of Strategic Management and Innovation at IMD. His research interests include technological innovation, strategic transformation, and change management. His teaching and research activities focus on why and how some firms can sustain new growth while others cannot. His research has examined the evolution of the global personal computer industry. Of six major firms where he conducted in-depth investigations on the subject, three of them were the largest motherboard makers in the world, the other three were the largest laptop manufacturers. Currently, Howard Yu is collaborating with private equity firms and venture capital funds in studying how established companies can expedite the process of creating new businesses by involving external entrepreneurs and third-party investors. He received his doctoral degree in management at Harvard Business School. Prior to his doctoral training, he worked in the banking industry in Hong Kong.

Research with leaders of global enterprises based in countries around the world – carried out before the Great Recession – revealed great concern that the preconditions that permit a market system to flourish and create wealth for all, was being undermined by a series of disruptive forces such as unstable financial system, a vulnerable trading system, growing income inequity and environmental degradation. These same leaders thought governments around the world too weak economically and politically to step up to these problems, and global institutions outdated in their design and powers. They did think that corporations could devise new strategies for sustainable profitable businesses that could mitigate some of the disruptive forces. The panel will present examples of successful strategies for discussion. (see full session details)

12:45 — 14:00
Closing Luncheon


Strategic Management Society

Lake Geneva